Buy & Sell Bitcoin in Canada Coinberry

How To End The Cryptocurrency Exchange "Wild West" Without Crippling Innovation


In case you haven't noticed the consultation paper, staff notice, and report on Quadriga, regulators are now clamping down on Canadian cryptocurrency exchanges. The OSC and other regulatory bodies are still interested in industry feedback. They have not put forward any official regulation yet. Below are some ideas/insights and a proposed framework.



Many of you have limited time to read the full proposal, so here are the highlights:

Offline Multi-Signature

Effective standards to prevent both internal and external theft. Exchange operators are trained and certified, and have a legal responsibility to users.

Regular Transparent Audits

Provides visibility to Canadians that their funds are fully backed on the exchange, while protecting privacy and sensitive platform information.

Insurance Requirements

Establishment of basic insurance standards/strategy, to expand over time. Removing risk to exchange users of any hot wallet theft.


Background and Justifications


Cold Storage Custody/Management
After reviewing close to 100 cases, all thefts tend to break down into more or less the same set of problems:
• Funds stored online or in a smart contract,
• Access controlled by one person or one system,
• 51% attacks (rare),
• Funds sent to the wrong address (also rare), or
• Some combination of the above.
For the first two cases, practical solutions exist and are widely implemented on exchanges already. Offline multi-signature solutions are already industry standard. No cases studied found an external theft or exit scam involving an offline multi-signature wallet implementation. Security can be further improved through minimum numbers of signatories, background checks, providing autonomy and legal protections to each signatory, establishing best practices, and a training/certification program.
The last two transaction risks occur more rarely, and have never resulted in a loss affecting the actual users of the exchange. In all cases to date where operators made the mistake, they've been fully covered by the exchange platforms.
• 51% attacks generally only occur on blockchains with less security. The most prominent cases have been Bitcoin Gold and Ethereum Classic. The simple solution is to enforce deposit limits and block delays such that a 51% attack is not cost-effective.
• The risk of transactions to incorrect addresses can be eliminated by a simple test transaction policy on large transactions. By sending a small amount of funds prior to any large withdrawals/transfers as a standard practice, the accuracy of the wallet address can be validated.
The proposal covers all loss cases and goes beyond, while avoiding significant additional costs, risks, and limitations which may be associated with other frameworks like SOC II.

On The Subject of Third Party Custodians
Many Canadian platforms are currently experimenting with third party custody. From the standpoint of the exchange operator, they can liberate themselves from some responsibility of custody, passing that off to someone else. For regulators, it puts crypto in similar categorization to oil, gold, and other commodities, with some common standards. Platform users would likely feel greater confidence if the custodian was a brand they recognized. If the custodian was knowledgeable and had a decent team that employed multi-sig, they could keep assets safe from internal theft. With the right protections in place, this could be a great solution for many exchanges, particularly those that lack the relevant experience or human resources for their own custody systems.
However, this system is vulnerable to anyone able to impersonate the exchange operators. You may have a situation where different employees who don't know each other that well are interacting between different companies (both the custodian and all their customers which presumably isn't just one exchange). A case study of what can go wrong in this type of environment might be Bitpay, where the CEO was tricked out of 5000 bitcoins over 3 separate payments by a series of emails sent legitimately from a breached computer of another company CEO. It's also still vulnerable to the platform being compromised, as in the really large $70M Bitfinex hack, where the third party Bitgo held one key in a multi-sig wallet. The hacker simply authorized the withdrawal using the same credentials as Bitfinex (requesting Bitgo to sign multiple withdrawal transactions). This succeeded even with the use of multi-sig and two heavily security-focused companies, due to the lack of human oversight (basically, hot wallet). Of course, you can learn from these cases and improve the security, but so can hackers improve their deception and at the end of the day, both of these would have been stopped by the much simpler solution of a qualified team who knew each other and employed multi-sig with properly protected keys. It's pretty hard to beat a human being who knows the business and the typical customer behaviour (or even knows their customers personally) at spotting fraud, and the proposed multi-sig means any hacker has to get through the scrutiny of 3 (or more) separate people, all of whom would have proper training including historical case studies.
There are strong arguments both for and against using use of third party custodians. The proposal sets mandatory minimum custody standards would apply regardless if the cold wallet signatories are exchange operators, independent custodians, or a mix of both.

On The Subject Of Insurance
ShakePay has taken the first steps into this new realm (congratulations). There is no question that crypto users could be better protected by the right insurance policies, and it certainly feels better to transact with insured platforms. The steps required to obtain insurance generally place attention in valuable security areas, and in this case included a review from CipherTrace. One of the key solutions in traditional finance comes from insurance from entities such as the CDIC.
However, historically, there wasn't found any actual insurance payout to any cryptocurrency exchange, and there are notable cases where insurance has not paid. With Bitpay, for example, the insurance agent refused because the issue happened to the third party CEO's computer instead of anything to do with Bitpay itself. With the Youbit exchange in South Korea, their insurance claim was denied, and the exchange ultimately ended up instead going bankrupt with all user's funds lost. To quote Matt Johnson in the original Lloyd's article: “You can create an insurance policy that protects no one – you know there are so many caveats to the policy that it’s not super protective.”
ShakePay's insurance was only reported to cover their cold storage, and “physical theft of the media where the private keys are held”. Physical theft has never, in the history of cryptocurrency exchange cases reviewed, been reported as the cause of loss. From the limited information of the article, ShakePay made it clear their funds are in the hands of a single US custodian, and at least part of their security strategy is to "decline[] to confirm the custodian’s name on the record". While this prevents scrutiny of the custodian, it's pretty silly to speculate that a reasonably competent hacking group couldn't determine who the custodian is. A far more common infiltration strategy historically would be social engineering, which has succeeded repeatedly. A hacker could trick their way into ShakePay's systems and request a fraudulent withdrawal, impersonate ShakePay and request the custodian to move funds, or socially engineer their way into the custodian to initiate the withdrawal of multiple accounts (a payout much larger than ShakePay) exploiting the standard procedures (for example, fraudulently initiating or override the wallet addresses of a real transfer). In each case, nothing was physically stolen and the loss is therefore not covered by insurance.
In order for any insurance to be effective, clear policies have to be established about what needs to be covered. Anything short of that gives Canadians false confidence that they are protected when they aren't in any meaningful way. At this time, the third party insurance market does not appear to provide adequate options or coverage, and effort is necessary to standardize custody standards, which is a likely first step in ultimately setting up an insurance framework.
A better solution compared to third party insurance providers might be for Canadian exchange operators to create their own collective insurance fund, or a specific federal organization similar to the CDIC. Such an organization would have a greater interest or obligation in paying out actual cases, and that would be it's purpose rather than maximizing it's own profit. This would be similar to the SAFU which Binance has launched, except it would cover multiple exchanges. There is little question whether the SAFU would pay out given a breach of Binance, and a similar argument could be made for a insurance fund managed by a collective of exchange operators or a government organization. While a third party insurance provider has the strong market incentive to provide the absolute minimum coverage and no market incentive to payout, an entity managed by exchange operators would have incentive to protect the reputation of exchange operators/the industry, and the government should have the interest of protecting Canadians.

On The Subject of Fractional Reserve
There is a long history of fractional reserve failures, from the first banks in ancient times, through the great depression (where hundreds of fractional reserve banks failed), right through to the 2008 banking collapse referenced in the first bitcoin block. The fractional reserve system allows banks to multiply the money supply far beyond the actual cash (or other assets) in existence, backed only by a system of debt obligations of others. Safely supporting a fractional reserve system is a topic of far greater complexity than can be addressed by a simple policy, and when it comes to cryptocurrency, there is presently no entity reasonably able to bail anyone out in the event of failure. Therefore, this framework is addressed around entities that aim to maintain 100% backing of funds.
There may be some firms that desire but have failed to maintain 100% backing. In this case, there are multiple solutions, including outside investment, merging with other exchanges, or enforcing a gradual restoration plan. All of these solutions are typically far better than shutting down the exchange, and there are multiple cases where they've been used successfully in the past.

Proof of Reserves/Transparency/Accountability
Canadians need to have visibility into the backing on an ongoing basis.
The best solution for crypto-assets is a Proof of Reserve. Such ideas go back all the way to 2013, before even Mt. Gox. However, no Canadian exchange has yet implemented such a system, and only a few international exchanges (CoinFloor in the UK being an example) have. Many firms like Kraken, BitBuy, and now ShakePay use the Proof of Reserve term to refer to lesser proofs which do not actually cryptographically prove the full backing of all user assets on the blockchain. In order for a Proof of Reserve to be effective, it must actually be a complete proof, and it needs to be understood by the public that is expected to use it. Many firms have expressed reservations about the level of transparency required in a complete Proof of Reserve (for example Kraken here). While a complete Proof of Reserves should be encouraged, and there are some solutions in the works (ie TxQuick), this is unlikely to be suitable universally for all exchange operators and users.
Given the limitations, and that firms also manage fiat assets, a more traditional audit process makes more sense. Some Canadian exchanges (CoinSquare, CoinBerry) have already subjected themselves to annual audits. However, these results are not presently shared publicly, and there is no guarantee over the process including all user assets or the integrity and independence of the auditor. The auditor has been typically not known, and in some cases, the identity of the auditor is protected by a NDA. Only in one case (BitBuy) was an actual report generated and publicly shared. There has been no attempt made to validate that user accounts provided during these audits have been complete or accurate. A fraudulent fractional exchange, or one which had suffered a breach they were unwilling to publicly accept (see CoinBene), could easily maintain a second set of books for auditors or simply exclude key accounts to pass an individual audit.
The proposed solution would see a reporting standard which includes at a minimum - percentage of backing for each asset relative to account balances and the nature of how those assets are stored, with ownership proven by the auditor. The auditor would also publicly provide a "hash list", which they independently generate from the accounts provided by the exchange. Every exchange user can then check their information against this public "hash list". A hash is a one-way form of encryption, which fully protects the private information, yet allows anyone who knows that information already to validate that it was included. Less experienced users can take advantage of public tools to calculate the hash from their information (provided by the exchange), and thus have certainty that the auditor received their full balance information. Easy instructions can be provided.
Auditors should be impartial, their identities and process public, and they should be rotated so that the same auditor is never used twice in a row. Balancing the cost of auditing against the needs for regular updates, a 6 month cycle likely makes the most sense.

Hot Wallet Management
The best solution for hot wallets is not to use them. CoinBerry reportedly uses multi-sig on all withdrawals, and Bitmex is an international example known for their structure devoid of hot wallets.
However, many platforms and customers desire fast withdrawal processes, and human validation has a cost of time and delay in this process.
A model of self-insurance or separate funds for hot wallets may be used in these cases. Under this model, a platform still has 100% of their client balance in cold storage and holds additional funds in hot wallets for quick withdrawal. Thus, the risk of those hot wallets is 100% on exchange operators and not affecting the exchange users. Since most platforms typically only have 1%-5% in hot wallets at any given time, it shouldn't be unreasonable to build/maintain these additional reserves over time using exchange fees or additional investment. Larger withdrawals would still be handled at regular intervals from the cold storage.
Hot wallet risks have historically posed a large risk and there is no established standard to guarantee secure hot wallets. When the government of South Korea dispatched security inspections to multiple exchanges, the results were still that 3 of them got hacked after the inspections. If standards develop such that an organization in the market is willing to insure the hot wallets, this could provide an acceptable alternative. Another option may be for multiple exchange operators to pool funds aside for a hot wallet insurance fund. Comprehensive coverage standards must be established and maintained for all hot wallet balances to make sure Canadians are adequately protected.

Current Draft Proposal

(1) Proper multi-signature cold wallet storage.
(a) Each private key is the personal and legal responsibility of one person - the “signatory”. Signatories have special rights and responsibilities to protect user assets. Signatories are trained and certified through a course covering (1) past hacking and fraud cases, (2) proper and secure key generation, and (3) proper safekeeping of private keys. All private keys must be generated and stored 100% offline by the signatory. If even one private keys is ever breached or suspected to be breached, the wallet must be regenerated and all funds relocated to a new wallet.
(b) All signatories must be separate background-checked individuals free of past criminal conviction. Canadians should have a right to know who holds their funds. All signing of transactions must take place with all signatories on Canadian soil or on the soil of a country with a solid legal system which agrees to uphold and support these rules (from an established white-list of countries which expands over time).
(c) 3-5 independent signatures are required for any withdrawal. There must be 1-3 spare signatories, and a maximum of 7 total signatories. The following are all valid combinations: 3of4, 3of5, 3of6, 4of5, 4of6, 4of7, 5of6, or 5of7.
(d) A security audit should be conducted to validate the cold wallet is set up correctly and provide any additional pertinent information. The primary purpose is to ensure that all signatories are acting independently and using best practices for private key storage. A report summarizing all steps taken and who did the audit will be made public. Canadians must be able to validate the right measures are in place to protect their funds.
(e) There is a simple approval process if signatories wish to visit any country outside Canada, with a potential whitelist of exempt countries. At most 2 signatories can be outside of aligned jurisdiction at any given time. All exchanges would be required to keep a compliant cold wallet for Canadian funds and have a Canadian office if they wish to serve Canadian customers.
(2) Regular and transparent solvency audits.
(a) An audit must be conducted at founding, after 3 months of operation, and at least once every 6 months to compare customer balances against all stored cryptocurrency and fiat balances. The auditor must be known, independent, and never the same twice in a row.
(b) An audit report will be published featuring the steps conducted in a readable format. This should be made available to all Canadians on the exchange website and on a government website. The report must include what percentage of each customer asset is backed on the exchange, and how those funds are stored.
(c) The auditor will independently produce a hash of each customer's identifying information and balance as they perform the audit. This will be made publicly available on the exchange and government website, along with simplified instructions that each customer can use to verify that their balance was included in the audit process.
(d) The audit needs to include a proof of ownership for any cryptocurrency wallets included. A satoshi test (spending a small amount) or partially signed transaction both qualify.
(e) Any platform without 100% reserves should be assessed on a regular basis by a government or industry watchdog. This entity should work to prevent any further drop, support any private investor to come in, or facilitate a merger so that 100% backing can be obtained as soon as possible.
(3) Protections for hot wallets and transactions.
(a) A standardized list of approved coins and procedures will be established to constitute valid cold storage wallets. Where a multi-sig process is not natively available, efforts will be undertaken to establish a suitable and stable smart contract standard. This list will be expanded and improved over time. Coins and procedures not on the list are considered hot wallets.
(b) Hot wallets can be backed by additional funds in cold storage or an acceptable third-party insurance provider with a comprehensive coverage policy.
(c) Exchanges are required to cover the full balance of all user funds as denominated in the same currency, or double the balance as denominated in bitcoin or CAD using an established trading rate. If the balance is ever insufficient due to market movements, the firm must rectify this within 24 hours by moving assets to cold storage or increasing insurance coverage.
(d) Any large transactions (above a set threshold) from cold storage to any new wallet addresses (not previously transacted with) must be tested with a smaller transaction first. Deposits of cryptocurrency must be limited to prevent economic 51% attacks. Any issues are to be covered by the exchange.
(e) Exchange platforms must provide suitable authentication for users, including making available approved forms of two-factor authentication. SMS-based authentication is not to be supported. Withdrawals must be blocked for 48 hours in the event of any account password change. Disputes on the negligence of exchanges should be governed by case law.

Steps Forward

Continued review of existing OSC feedback is still underway. More feedback and opinions on the framework and ideas as presented here are extremely valuable. The above is a draft and not finalized.
The process of further developing and bringing a suitable framework to protect Canadians will require the support of exchange operators, legal experts, and many others in the community. The costs of not doing such are tremendous. A large and convoluted framework, one based on flawed ideas or implementation, or one which fails to properly safeguard Canadians is not just extremely expensive and risky for all Canadians, severely limiting to the credibility and reputation of the industry, but an existential risk to many exchanges.
The responsibility falls to all of us to provide our insight and make our opinions heard on this critical matter. Please take the time to give your thoughts.
submitted by azoundria2 to QuadrigaInitiative [link] [comments]

White Swan came, Black Swan's a comin'

Like many here, I'm trying to come up with an investment thesis and a strategy for these uncertain times. I'm currently Bearish - have gone largely to cash, but want to invest in defensive plays because I see much more uncertainty ahead. So this long and rambling post is going to try to play with some ideas I've been having about the future. For the record, I've been investing for 8 years, was primarily an ETF buy and hold investor, and am Canadian, with a background in Political Science. ( I mean, I've got an undergraduate degree and a long-time interest, I'm no expert or nothing.)
I've read Nassim Taleb's Incerto series and have been mainly convinced, I think, and am surprised at the number of people who are calling this a Black Swan (BS) event; there's a post from today where a guy points out that it's not, and that Taleb himself says it's not and he got downvoted to hell. So first off: the Covid-19 pandemic was not a Black Swan. The Covid-19 pandemic, or one like it, has been predicted by damn near everybody for decades. The Obama administration even used a similar pandemic as a war game to get the Trump administration up to speed during the transition, Bill Gates called this years ago, we had a similar outbreak in SARS and H1N1, etc. Even if that wasn't the case, C19 would only be a BS for China - as a bunch of media sources have pointed out, there were US intelligence reports as far back as December saying this would be a huge deal, which were ignored by the administration. So all the suggestions that this is a BS event are really just pointing out how bad many governments, markets, and corporations are at predicting the future - they're unable to predict or prepare, or respond appropriately for a predictable event and only capable of reacting (with the exception of some countries like South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Germany...)
Now with the market rallying the bulls are all saying "it's priced in, you can't fight the Fed, etc," and I'm thinking:
1) The emperor has no clothes; the US government is clearly incompetent. It couldn't even listen to it's own experts about the likely extent of the pandemic, had no plan or even seemingly the ability to be at all proactive. For example, an aircraft carrier had a port call in Vietnam, during the middle of a pandemic that started in Asia. Then, completely predictably, it had an outbreak of C19 and it's capabilities were badly damaged and the administration couldn't even properly help it's own ship, nor manage the public relations fallout that resulted. I mean, do you have any idea how insane it is that that ship was allowed to dock during a pandemic? One of the most powerful military devices that ever existed got taken off line cause the administration couldn't understand it's own intelligence.
This incompetence isn't limited to the US of course - the UK handled their initial response badly and had to switch horses mid-race, Canada lagged badly responding as well, Italy and Spain mismanaged their response - but I'd argue that the US, given their advantages in intelligence collection, should have been best positioned to deal with this crisis so I focus on them.
2) Because of this, I think the odds of a real Black Swan event have gone up considerably, and if one does occur, it will occur when the US is historically divided and weakened and where it's economic system is out of ammunition to deal with a second crisis. I'll explain:
We have been living at at time when major geopolitical disruptions have been absent - while proxy wars and minor terrorist attacks still occur, there's been no wars between great powers for some time, and I think many have come to see this as natural; that the unipolar world will continue. But Russia is resurgent, China has a 50 year plan to grow its economy and eventually take a place as a hegemon, which may be entering end-game, and much of the Western international community has grown uncomfortable with US leadership, given the American tendency to elect incompetent Republicans. So we're likely entering an era of uncertainty and increased instability as the contenders vie for status in the new international order.
This doesn't mean war or open combat - it's become a cliche that the new wars of the 21st century are economic ones, and, given nuclear proliferation that's likely to continue. And I think we're more likely to see significant economic combat in the next 6 months than at almost any time during the last decade, because: 1) Trump is incompetent (and here I should stop just shitting on Republicans... the Dems have picked a 77 year old half senile fool to go up against him. I mean, looking at the two guys contending for the leadership of the most powerful country that has ever existed, it's hard to come away thinking that this is the sign of a healthy political system.)
2)America is weak (relatively speaking obviously, they're still the undisputed big swinging dick) and divided.
3)Because of C19 hits to economy, Trump may not be re-elected. I suspect that if it looked likely that he's re-elected, China at least would be content to sit quiet and wait for 4 more years of dumbasserry to take its toll on US hegemony - similarly with Russia. But if it looks like he'll lose come November, they'll take advantage.
What would that economic war look like? Lots of options that I see, and I'm curious if you guys see other ones. I mean, what would it look like if China dumped treasuries over the next 7 months? Or what would happen if China and Russia, or even OPEC+ decided to trade oil in non-US dollars? Or what if China leverages foreign aid to African and Asian countries hard-hit by C19 for long term trade deals designed to damage US interests? Iran and North Korea are additionally wild cards, and if either one is hard hit by C19 could go down flailing with unpredictable results. Any others I'm missing? Curious to hear other's ideas.
Now, note I'm not saying that odds of economic war with China or any other US adversary are likely; I'm saying if the odds of a geopolitical Black Swan were usually 5% in any given year of the last twenty, I suspect the odds of a major BS have gone up 4 or 5 fold - so like 20-30%. And I'm wondering, given unlimited QE, zero interest rates almost everywhere, central banks everywhere supporting stock and currency markets, etc -- what a defensive portfolio, preferably one that's still exposed to positive black swans like a sudden cure, would look like. Is it gold or silver? Cash? Bitcoin? I've already got enough guns and bullets and a bunker... just kidding about the bunker.
But seriously, I'm thinking something like 10-20% PMs and miners, 20% cash, 20% bonds and the rest equity ETFs of some countries likely to benefit from a stronger and more dominant China, like South Korea and Australia. Given Chinese dishonesty and the opacity of the financial system, investing directly in Chinese companies makes me nervous, though I've been considering a stake in BABA. Canada, it seems to me, is too joined at the hip with the USA to do anything other than follow where it goes.
Anyways, if you stuck with me through all that, thanks and I'd love to hear other's thoughts. I'm absolutely not a prepper nor prone to panic -- I just think we're living in real interesting times and the times are likely to get interestinger in the near future.
submitted by Davidallencoen to investing [link] [comments]

Removed comments/submissions for /u/much-wow-doge

Hi much-wow-doge, you're not shadowbanned, but 7 of your most recent 125 comments/submissions were removed (either automatically or by human moderators).

Submissions:

i0284y in Gold on 29 Jul 20 (1pts):
Bought a 1 Oz Canadian Maple in Assay from APMEX, good buy?
2cou3c in beermoney on 05 Aug 14 (0pts):
Up to $4 USD in Bitcoin for a quick task/some help
2cnm86 in beermoney on 05 Aug 14 (1pts):
Up to $4 USD in BTC for a quick task/some help
2cmjos in CryptoCurrency on 04 Aug 14 (0pts):
Giving up to $4 Bitcoin to sign up for Stellar.org with Facebook
2cl7nw in CryptogenicBullion on 04 Aug 14 (0pts):
[HIRING] Giving up to $4 CGB to sign up for Stellar.org with Facebook
2chslg in dogecoin on 03 Aug 14 (0pts):
HIRING: Register on Stellar.org and Send me your STR, receive 2k DOGE. [UNLIMITED]
2chpor in Jobs4Bitcoins on 03 Aug 14 (0pts):
HIRING: Register on Stellar.org and Send me your STR, receive $1.50 USD in BTC. [UNLIMITED] (
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Help us expose and stand up to social media bias and censorship!
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QUADRIGA 2.0 = COINBERRY?

TL;DR- A "Canadian" crypto exchange has been blowing off customers while their accounts and funds are frozen. Their company isn't trading in Canada, their PR hlooks grandiose but in fact isn't impressive at all, and they are now lying to customers about the reason for the delays.
FULL BREAKDOWN
Coinberry uses "trusted by the Canadian Government" as their main call-to-action and as leverage to gain your business due to their partnership with two municipalities (Richmond Hill and Innisfil township) Townships are NOT part of the Canadian Federal Government, they are municipalities. Municipalities are autonomous. The Canadian federal government and LOCAL government aren't the same thing, that is fraudulent representation.
The mayor of Innisfil has been known to accept gifts from companies trying to get in his favour. Only 5% of CANADIANS- not Innisfil residents, hold cryptocurrency. So, in a town of 36K people, where the majority of the population is 50+ in age, how many are likely to hold bitcoin? Coinberry is the only one benefiting from this; they get to say they've partnered with a township, and if anyone actually wanted to pay property tax in Bitcoin then they need to sign up with Coinberry.
The special information package tells Innisfil residents that "Coinberry has fully supportive, transparent and CDIC insured segregated banking in Canada (page 2/26) A quick Google search will tell you that's false - the CDIC does NOT cover digital currencies as of April 30th, 2020. The document linked stating this was made in 2019. How much did this mayor get paid to lie to his citizens?! I doubt he'd do it for free.
They leverage being PIPEDA compliant, yet all you need is a self assessment tool. It's based on opinion, yet it's their first selling point. It's a garbage selling point that gives false confidence to potential clients.
FINTRAC REGISTRY AND THEIR SHELL COMPANY IN MALTA
They claim to be the only FINTRAC registered company. Nope. A quick search of other crypto exchanges in the FINTRAC lookup proves that claim wrong: https://www10.fintrac-canafe.gc.ca/msb-esm/public/msb-search/search-by-name/
Their privacy policy mentions a parent company. Their parent company is listed on FINTRAC as CB INTERNATIONAL LIMITED, and is based in Malta. For those of you who aren't aware, Malta is well known for being the best place to set up shell companies in order to avoid taxes and protect CEOs from lawsuits after "their" money. This was NOT the case for Kraken, Newton or Shakepay. Only Coinberry feels they need a shell company in another country.
They have 4 companies listed, all Coinberry. All 4 listings show Coinberrys agent activities listed as money transferring, and 2 of them are listed as agents of CB INTERNATIONAL LIMITED (the parent company). This parent company is located in Malta and has listed its activities as foreign exchange and money transferring. This means all of the exchanges happening are actually happening in MALTA not Canada.
They seem to be the only exchange (with Canadian HQ) doing this: Kraken, Newton and Shakepay list their agent activities as foreign exchange dealing, and all are registered IN CANADA. This implies your money is also staying in Canada on their platforms.
Where there is smoke, there is fire.
edit: added a TL;DR, took out unnecessary sentences, cleaned up wording. I was pissed when I wrote this. I just want to see Coinberry suits come clean about the delays. Tell people why you can't get their money back as soon as you said you would, because this only making crypto even scarier for new adopters.
submitted by cosmicariel to Scams [link] [comments]

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0x FAQ | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
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W8 information | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
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Security key restrictions | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Form 1099-K Tax Information for Coinbase Pro and Prime | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
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Address formatting standards | Coinbase Custody Help
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ID document verification | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
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International support | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
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Ethereum Classic (ETC) FAQ | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
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Orchid FAQ | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Payment methods for US customers | Coinbase Help {1-812-785-1006}
DAI FAQ | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Coinbase Help {1-812-785-1006}
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How to open a Coinbase Pro account | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Coinbase Custody Help
How to access privacy settings and make requests | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Managing Google Authenticator | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Stellar Lumens (XLM) FAQ | Coinbase Help {1-812-785-1006}
Supported cryptocurrencies | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
API developer terms | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
2-step verification FAQ | Coinbase Help {1-812-785-1006}
How can I update my legal name? | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
How do I set up 2-factor authentication? | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Lost email access | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
FAQ on API | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Applying for a Coinbase business account | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Bitcoin SV FAQ | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
How to withdraw funds from a closed account | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
I can't remember my password | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Slippage warning | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
How do I verify my identity when using the mobile app? | Coinbase Help {1-812-785-1006}
Margin Trading FAQ | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Where can I spend Bitcoin? | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
What is the Bitcoin Blockchain? | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Invest responsibly: recommended account management practices | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Privacy data request FAQ | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Landlines and 2-step verification | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Reset my password | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
I have lost or need to update my phone or 2-step verification device | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Is Bitcoin secure? Has this network ever been hacked? | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Account recovery FAQ | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Dash (DASH) FAQ | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Cosmos (ATOM) FAQ | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Verifying your identity | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
How is Coinbase insured? | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Minimum age requirement | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
What is a Bitcoin wallet? | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Adding a payment method | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Basic Attention Token FAQ | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Prohibited regions | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
2-step verification FAQ | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Kyber (KNC) 101 | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Using Destination Tag on Coinbase Pro | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Does Coinbase Pro support smart contracts? | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
Phone-based attacks | Coinbase Help {1-812-785-1006}
What are the eligibility requirements for US Margin Trading? | Coinbase Pro Help {1-812-785-1006}
submitted by PersonalDoctor to u/PersonalDoctor [link] [comments]

Best exchange to connect seamlessly to TD?

Hi Guys,
I'm looking for an exchange or service that allows me to exchange Bitcoin into Canadian dollars and then transfer them seamlessly into my bank account with TD in Canada. Any suggestions? Not sure if it's relevant, but I do not live in Canada at the moment.
A bit of context: I have a verified account with Kraken, but they require signing up with Etana to transfer fiat currency in or out, and that didn't work out.
I also have an account with Binance, but they don't have BTC-CAD trading.
Thanks in advance!
submitted by technomad to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

Bull Bitcoin’s Dollar-Cost Averaging tool for Canadians: a detailed overview

Hello fellow Canadian Bitcoiners!
I'm Francis Pouliot, CEO and founder of Bull Bitcoin (previously known as Bitcoin Outlet) and Bylls.
I haven't been active on Reddit for a while but I thought I'd pop back here to let the community know about our new dollar-cost averaging feature, "Recurring Buy"
This post is a copy of my most recent medium article which you can read here if you want to see the screenshots. https://medium.com/bull-bitcoin/bull-bitcoins-dollar-cost-averaging-tool-for-canadians-the-right-time-to-buy-bitcoin-is-every-day-82a992ca22c1
Thanks in advance for any feedback and suggestions!
[Post starts here]
The Bull Bitcoin team is constantly trying to reduce the frictions ordinary people face when investing in Bitcoin and propose innovative features which ensure our users follow Bitcoin best practices and minimize their risks.
We are particularly excited and proud about our latest feature: an automated Bitcoin dollar-cost averaging tool which we dubbed “Recurring Buy”.
The Recurring Buy feature lets Bull Bitcoin users create an automated schedule that will buy Bitcoin every day using the funds in their account balance and send the Bitcoin directly to their Bitcoin wallet straight away.
We put a lot of thought in the implementation details and striking the right trade-offs for a simple and elegant solution. Our hope is that it will become a standard other Bitcoin exchanges will emulate for the benefit of their users. This standard will certainly evolve over time as we accumulate feedback and operational experience.
In this article, I cover:
The problem that we are trying to solve
Recurring Buy feature details, processes and instructions
The rationale (and tradeoffs) behind the main feature design choices
Bull Bitcoin is only available to Canadians, but non-Canadians that wish to have a look at how it works are welcome to make a Bull Bitcoin account and check out how it works here. You will be able to go through the process of create the schedule for testing purposes, but you wont be able to fund your account and actually purchase Bitcoin.
What problems does Dollar-Cost Averaging solve?
The most common concern of Bitcoin investors is, not surprisingly, “when is the right time to buy Bitcoin?”. Bitcoin is indeed a very volatile asset. A quick glance at a Bitcoin price chart shows there are without a doubt “worse times” and “better times” to invest in Bitcoin. But is that the same as the “right” time?
Gurus, analysts and journalists continuously offer their theories explaining what affects the Bitcoin price, supported by fancy trading charts and geopolitical analysis, further reinforcing the false notion that it is possible to predict the price of Bitcoin.
Newbies are constantly bombarded with mainstream media headlines of spectacular gains and devastating losses. For some, this grows into an irresistible temptation to get rich quick. Others become crippled with the fear of becoming “the sucker” on which early adopters dump their bags.
Veterans are haunted by past Bitcoin purchases which were quickly followed by a crash in the price. “I should have waited to buy the dip…”
Many Bitcoin veterans and long-term investors often shrug off the question of when is the right time to buy with the philosophy: “just hodl”. But even those holding until their death will recognize that buying more Bitcoin for the same price is a better outcome.
Given the very high daily volatility of Bitcoin, a hodler can find himself in many years having significantly less wealth just because he once bought Bitcoin on a Monday instead of a Wednesday. His options are either to leave it up to chance or make an attempt to “time the market” and “buy the dip”, which can turn into a stressful trading obsession, irrational decisions (which have a negative impact on budget, income and expenses) and severe psychological trauma. In addition, trying to “buy the dip” is often synonymous to keeping large amounts of fiat on an exchange to be ready for “when the time comes”.
There must be a better way.
Bitcoin investors should be rewarded for having understood Bitcoin’s long-term value proposition early on, for having taken the risk to invest accordingly and for having followed best practices. Not for being lucky.
Overview of features and rules
In this section I go into every detail of the Recurring Buy feature. In the following section, I focus on explaining why we chose this particular user experience.
The user first decides his target investment amount. Ideally, this is a monthly budget or yearly budget he allocates to investing in Bitcoin based on his projected income and expenses.
The user then chooses either the duration of the Recurring Buy schedule or the daily purchase amount. The longer the better.
The frequency is each day and cannot be modified.
The user must submit a Bitcoin address before activating a Recurring Buy schedule. By default, every transaction will be sent to that Bitcoin address. It’s the fallback address in case they don’t provide multiple addresses later.
Once the user has filled the form with target amount, the duration and the Bitcoin address, he can activate the Recurring Buy Schedule.
The user is not required to already have funds in his account balance to activate the schedule.
We will randomly select a time of day at which his transaction will be processed (every hour, so 24 possible times). If the user insists on another time of day, he can cancel his Recurring Buy schedule and try again.


The Recurring Buy feature as displayed on bullbitcoin.com/recurring-buys
The schedule is then displayed to the user, showing the time and date at which transactions that will take place in the future. The user will be able to see how long his current balance will last.
He can follow the progress of the dollar-cost averaging schedule, monitor in real time his average acquisition cost, and audit each transaction individually.
At this point, the user can and should change the Bitcoin address of his next transactions to avoid address re-use. Address re-use is not forbidden, but it is highly discouraged.
After having modified the Bitcoin addresses, there is nothing left for the user to do except watch the bitcoins appear in his Bitcoin wallet every day!
The Bitcoins are sent right away at the time of purchase.
Bitcoin transactions using the Recurring Buy feature will have the lowest possible Bitcoin network transaction fee to avoid creating upwards pressure on the fee market impact other network users.


What users see after first activating a schedule
The Recurring Buy schedule will be cancelled automatically at the time of the next purchase if the balance is insufficient. He can add more funds to his balance whenever he wants.
The Recurring Buy schedule will continue until the target amount is reached or until the account balance runs out.
The user can cancel his Recurring Buy schedule whenever he wants.
If the user wants to change the amount or duration of the schedule, he can simply cancel his current schedule and create a new one.
Each schedule has a unique identifier so that users can keep track of various schedules they perform over time.
Once a schedule is completed, either fully or partially, a summary will be provided which shows the number of transactions completed, the average acquisition cost, the total amount of Bitcoin purchase and the total amount of fiat spent. Useful for accounting!


A partially completed Recurring Buy schedule cancelled after 9 days due to insufficient funds
Though process in making our design choices
Recurring Bitcoin Purchases vs. Recurring Payment/Funding
The first and most important design choice was to separate the processes of funding the account balance with fiat (the payment) from the process of buying Bitcoin (the purchase). Users do not need to make a bank transaction every time they do a Bitcoin purchase. They first fund their account manually on their own terms, and the recurring purchases are debited from their pre-funded account balance.
Another approach would have been to automatically withdraw fiat from the user’s bank account (e.g. a direct debit or subscription billing) for each transaction (like our friends at Amber) or to instruct the user to set-up recurring payments to Bull Bitcoin from their bank account (like our friends at Bittr). The downside of these strategies is that they require numerous bank transactions which increases transaction fees and the likelihood of triggering fraud and compliance flags at the user’s bank. However, this does remove the user’s need to keep larger amounts of fiat on the exchange and reduces the friction of having to make manual bank payments.
Bull Bitcoin is currently working on a separate “Recurring Funding” feature that will automatically debit fiat from the user’s bank accounts using a separate recurring schedule with a minimum frequency of once a week, with a target of once every two weeks or once a month to match the user’s income frequency. This can, and will, be used in combination from the “Recurring Buy” feature, but both can be used separately.
The ultimate experience that we wish to achieve is that users will automatically set aside, each paycheck (two weeks), a small budget to invest in Bitcoin using the “Recurring Funding” feature which is sufficient to refill their account balance for the next two weeks of daily recurring purchases.
Frequency of transactions
The second important decision was about customizing the frequency of the schedule. We decided to make it “each day” only. This is specifically to ensure users have a large enough sample size and remain consistent which are the two key components to a successful dollar-cost averaging strategy.
A higher amount of recurring transactions (larger sample size) will result in the user’s average acquisition being closer to the actual average Bitcoin price over that period of time. Weekly or monthly recurring purchases can provide the same effectiveness if they are performed over a duration of time which is 7x longer (weekly) or 30x longer (monthly).
It is our belief that the longer the duration of the schedule, the more likely the user is to cancel the recurring buy schedule in order to “buy the dip”. Dollar-cost averaging is boring, and watching sats appear in the wallet every day is a good way to reduce the temptation of breaking the consistency.
We do not force this on users: they can still cancel the schedule if they want and go all-in. We consider it more of a gentle nudge in the right direction.
Frequency of withdrawals (one purchase = one bitcoin transaction)
This is one of the most interesting design choices because it is a trade-off between scalability (costs), privacy and custody. Ultimately, we decided that trust-minimization (no custody) and privacy were the most important at the expense of long-term scalability and costs.
Realistically, Bitcoin network fees are currently low and we expect them to remain low for the near future, although they will certainly increase massively over the long-term. One of the ways we mitigated this problem was to select the smallest possible transaction fee for transactions done in the context of Recurring Buy, separate from regular transaction fees on regular Bitcoin purchases (which, at Bull Bitcoin, are very generous).
Note: users must merge their UTXOs periodically to avoid being stuck with a large amount of small UTXOs in the future when fees become more expensive. This is what makes me most uncomfortable about our solution. I hope to also solve this problem, but it is ultimately something Bitcoin wallets need to address as well. Perhaps an automated tool in Bitcoin wallets which merges UTXOs periodically when the fees are low? Food for thought.
When transaction fees and scalability becomes a problem for us, it will have become a problem for all other small payments on the Bitcoin network, and we will use whatever solution is most appropriate at that time.
It is possible that Lightning Network ends up being the scalability solution, although currently it is logistically very difficult to perform automated payouts to users using Lightning, particularly recurring payouts, which require users to create Bolt11 invoices and to convince other peers in the network to open channels and fund channels with them for inbound capacity.
These are the general trade-offs:
Send a Bitcoin transaction for every purchase (what we do) - Most expensive for the exchange - Most expensive for the user (many UTXOs) - Increases Bitcoin Network UTXOs set - Inefficient usage of block space - Most private - Zero custody risk
Keep custody of the Bitcoin until the schedule is over or when the user requests a withdrawal (what Coinbase does) - No additional costs -No blockchain bloating - Same level of privacy - High custody risk
Batch user transactions together at fixed intervals (e.g. every day) - Slightly lower transaction costs for the exchange - Same costs for the user - Slightly more efficient use of block space - Same level of UTXO set bloating - Much lower level of privacy - Slightly higher custody risk
Single address vs multiple addresses vs HD keys (xpubs)
The final decision we had to make was preventing address re-use and allowing users to provide an HD key (xpub) rather than a Bitcoin address.
Address re-use generally decreases privacy because it becomes possible for third-party blockchain snoops to figure out that multiple Bitcoin transactions are going to the same user. But we must also consider that even transactions are sent to multiple addresses, particularly if they are small amounts, it is highly likely that the user will “merge” the coins into a single transaction when spending from his wallet. It is always possible for users to prevent this using Coinjoin, in which there is a large privacy gain in not re-using addresses compared to using a single address.
It is important to note that this does not decrease privacy compared to regular Bitcoin purchases on Bull Bitcoin outside of “Recurring Buy”. Whether a user has one transaction of $1000 going to a Bitcoin address or 10x$100 going that same Bitcoin address doesn’t reveal any new information about the user other than the fact he is likely using a dollar-cost averaging mechanism. It is rather a missed opportunity to gain more privacy.
Another smaller decision was whether or not we should ask the user to provide all his addresses upfront before being able to activate the schedule, which would completely remove the possibility of address re-use. We ultimately decided that because this process can take a very long time (imagine doing Recurring Buy every day for 365 days) it is better to let the user do this at his own pace, particularly because he may eventually change his Bitcoin wallet and forget to change the addresses in the schedule.
There are also various legitimate use-cases where users have no choice but to re-use the same address . A discussion for another day!
Asking the user to provide an XPUB is a great solution to address re-use. The exchange must dynamically derive a new Bitcoin address for the user at each transaction, which is not really a technical challenge. As far as I can tell, Bittr is the only Bitcoin exchange exchange which has implemented this technique. Kudos!
It is however important that the user doesn’t reuse this XPUB for anything else, otherwise the exchange can track his entire wallet balance and transaction history.
It is worth noting that not all wallets support HD keys or have HD keys by default (e.g. Bitcoin Core). So it is imperative that we offer the option to give Bitcoin addresses. We believe there is a lot of potential to create wallet coordination mechanisms between senders and recipients which would make this process a lot more streamlined.
In the future, we will certainly allow users to submit an XPUB instead of having to manually input a different address. But for now, we wanted to reduce the complexity to a minimum.
Conclusion: personal thoughts
I have a somewhat unique perspective on Bitcoin users due to the fact that I worked at the Bitcoin Embassy for almost 4 years. During this time, I had the opportunity to discuss face-to-face with thousands of Bitcoin investors. One of my favourite anecdotes is a nocoiner showing up at our office in December 2013 with a bag full of cash attempting to buy Bitcoin, “I know how to read a chart”, furious after being turned away. Many people who went “all-in” for short-term gains (usually altcoins) would show up to the Bitcoin Embassy office months later with heart-breaking stories.
This isn’t what I signed up for. My goal is to help people opt-out of fiat and, ultimately, to destroy the fiat currency system entirely.
This instilled in me a deep-rooted concern for gambling addiction and strong aversion to “trading”. I do not believe that Bitcoin exchanges should blindly follow “what the market dictates”. More often than not, what dictates the market is bad habits users formed because of the other Bitcoin services they used in the past, what other people are used to, and what feels familiar. Running a Bitcoin company should be inseparable from educating users on the best practices, and embedding these best practices into the user experience is the best way for them to learn.
Another important anecdote which motivated me to build a dollar-cost averaging tool is a person very close to me that had made the decision to buy Bitcoin, but was so stressed out about when was the right time to buy that they ended up not buying Bitcoin for a whole 6 months after funding their Bull Bitcoin account. That person eventually gave up and ultimately invested a large amount all at once. In hindsight, it turned out to be one of the worst possible times to invest in Bitcoin during that year.
Investing in Bitcoin can, and should be, a positive and rewarding experience.
Buying Bitcoin every day is the right strategy, but it is not necessarily lead to the best outcome.
The reality is that the best time to buy Bitcoin is at when market hits rock bottom (obviously). Sometimes, the upside from buying the dip can be much bigger than the risk (e.g. when the price dropped below $200 in 2015). But these are exceptions rather than the rule. And the cost of chasing dips is very high: stress, investing time and mental energy, and the very real psychological trauma which results from making bad trading decisions. Ultimately, it’s better to do the right thing than being lucky, but it’s not always a bad idea to cheat on your dollar-cost averaging from time to time if you can live with the costs and consequences.
Yours truly,
Francis
submitted by FrancisPouliot to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

I Got Scammed by the Cryptocurrency Exchange EZBTC.CA

I wanted to make this post of my experience as a warning to others, especially Canadians as they have limited buying options when investing (speculating) into cryptocurrencies. I understand the subject of cryptocurrencies are polarizing to many, but nonetheless, it's an emerging asset class that deserves discussion because there are many ways to lose your funds. This isn't the fault of cryptocurrencies themselves, but the result of user error, outright scams, social engineering, hacks, or in my case not being up-to-date on current events.

There are many scams in cryptocurrencies, but shady exchanges are a classic dating back to the legendary Mt. Gox hack where 850,000 Bitcoins were stolen (worth approximately $4.6 billion at the time of this writing). Or the most recent Canadian QuadrigaCX exchange hack where the CEO allegedly died in India carrying the only private key to 200 million worth of customer funds.

It seems that exchange hacks keep propping up in the news, so why then do they keep happening even in 2019? Because users are left with limited choices if they want to acquire cryptocurrency in the safest (ironic) and most convenient manner. In order to buy cryptocurrency, you first have to exchange it for fiat currency (USD, CAD, EUR). You could buy cryptocurrency from one of those Bitcoin ATMs you see at the mall but the fees are exorbitant and quite a few require ID as it is, so why not just sign up for an exchange instead? The next option is to buy them peer-to-peer in person for cash, but people feel unsafe dealing with strangers and large amounts of money. Further, liquidity would be an issue. This led to a boom of many cryptocurrency exchanges offering customers a place to buy and sell with the exchanges acting as the middle-man between users.

I've been away from cryptocurrency for a while and only came back recently. I've used the EZBTC exchange in the past without issues and decided I would use them again. What I didn't do upon my return was my homework on any updates/news regarding this exchange which resulted in my ordeal now. I noticed the website had an overhaul that now includes an express option for you to receive faster withdrawals if you deposited larger amounts (first red flag). I opted for the regular option I always used in the past and sent a small amount via eTransfer that was deposited in my account almost immediately (second red flag). In the past, my eTransfers regardless of amount took some time and up to many hours. Nonetheless, I made a purchase and initiated a withdrawal request that still hasn't been sent out to this day, and I am not the only one.

A condensed version of my story is that I got worried about my pending withdrawal with EZBTC and my emails/calls went unanswered. The live chat on their website was also disabled. I decided to tweet my situation to @ezBtcCanada and immediately got an email from the owner David Smillie himself urgently telling me to call him on a personal number. He deverified and suspended my account as a result of my tweets @tokenflair for "security reasons". After some talk (me saying I'll delete the tweets) he immediately reactivated and reverified my account again and said that my withdrawal will be taken care of the next day.

Fast forward to the next day and my withdrawal is still pending. Calls/texts/email go unanswered again. Live chat is still disabled. I proceed to send another tweet instead. Like clockwork, I get a response from David shortly after and he was livid. He threatened to sue me for defamation if I continued posting about my situation on public forums. I told him I'll be waiting for his letter. He stated that my account would be receiving a lifetime ban and I will not be receiving my withdrawal but I would get an eTransfer refund in 30 days, and all this information would be included in an email I was supposed to receive on Monday April 22, 2019. I still have not received any such email, and my emails/call/texts to him are again being ignored. The saga continues.

The most important piece of advice I can give when it comes to cryptocurrency is that what's true today, is not true tomorrow. You must stay up-to-date on current events in cryptocurrency because your investment could be at stake. In my case, EZBTC was exhibiting red flags and had many user complaints that I would have seen had I just done some research prior to sending my money. I was not up-to-date regarding the status of this "exchange".

David Smillie (owner of ezbtc.ca) operating under business # 1081627 B.C LTD. currently has 5 ongoing lawsuits against his company for unpaid funds:

  1. File number: 1812420 - GOLDLUST, Joseph v 1081627 B.C. LTD. - Supreme Civil (General)
  2. File number: 1963965 - ROBERTS, John v 1081627 B.C. LTD. - Provincial Small Claims
  3. File number: 172818 - GODWIN, Richard v 1081627 BC LTD - Supreme Civil (General)
  4. File number: 18104 - MCCALLUM, Evan v 1081627 BC LTD - Provincial Small Claims
  5. File number: 1862507 - WONG, Gary v 1081627 BC LTD. - Provincial Small Claims

You can get the latest information on all pending lawsuits against EZBTC here:
https://justice.gov.bc.ca/cso/esearch/civil/partySearch.do

List of numerous complaints against David Smillie and EZBTC:

https://files.fm/f/23ej52ff (David Smillie sued by Richard Godwin)

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/bahzsm/another_bc_lawsuit_filed_against_ezbtc_1081627_bc/ (David Smillie sued by John Roberts)

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/99fs6i/2_new_court_filings_against_ezbtc_in_the_past_week/ (More lawsuits)

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/8mjtjb/amaa_exowner_of_ezbtc_resigned_when_i_realized_it/ (Ex-CTO of EZBTC blows whistle)

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/b53zq3/please_sticky_this_post_im_a_developer_who_worked/ (EZBTC developer blows whistle)

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/939ce2/40_days_and_counting_fiat_withdrawal_ezbtcca/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/926adi/ezbtcca_may_have_gone_bust_toronto_offices_have/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/973yrz/ezbtcca_is_likely_insolvent/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/98njea/worth_visiting_ezbtc_offices/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/901847/concern_regarding_ezbtc/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/9181nx/banned_from_ezbtcca_chatroomhave_not_rcvd/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/arnboh/ezbtc_will_my_girlfriend_ever_see_her_money/

https://coiniq.com/ezbtc-review/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/ao680q/what_are_customers_latest_experiences_with_ezbtc/

https://warosu.org/biz/thread/10773849

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/bfqrv1/fortune_jack_here_regarding_david_smillie_and/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/b57fq9/ezbtc_terms_of_service_wayback_machine/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/arfa5x/ezbtc_is_so_fake_check_this_out/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/95rpl5/to_those_staying_silent_for_ezbtc_defamation/
submitted by TokenFlair to PersonalFinanceCanada [link] [comments]

Fore Hire - Crypto-Currency / Blockchain Developer -- Experienced and Professional

Just finished developing out a larger wallet platform, so thought I would throw this out there. Briefly, 38 year old Canadian, 19 years high paced and professional experience within online software, with 8 of those years being bitcoin / crypto-currency. I'm the type who knows the protocol inside out, key generation and management, the cryptography to generate addresses and sign txs, BIP32, multi-sig, the message protocol to communicate directly with nodes on the P2P network, etc.
Well versed with online security, and excellent at non-custodial wallet systems where every user gets their own BIP32 wallet and funds are user segregated. Have done dozens of these operations, everything including traditional exchange, P2P exchange ala Localbitcoins, multi-vendor marketplace, merchant payment gateway, secure web wallets, coin mixers, lottery site, block explorer, jobs board, eCommerce, and the list goes on. Can do anything in your imagination.
You can view details of a base system at: https://envrin.com/secure_wallet
Demo admin panel at: https://demo.envrin.com/admin/
For a better idea of who I am and my skillset, I created Apex at: https://apexpl.io/
And if you want an idea of how in-depth I go into the protocol, I wrote an article at: https://apexpl.github.io/bitcoin_cash_sv_abc_transaction_signatures.html
Speaking of that, can now offer full support for the Bitcoin Cash / SV / ABC protocols, plus any Bitcoin deratives. Don't have ETH just yet, but that can be easily added in if your operation requires it.
If you have the desire to jump into the crypto-currency / blockchain game, and need a comprehensive, secure and scalable solution for your operation, I'm your guy. More than happy to provide you with consultation, and answer any questions you have. Rate is $50/hour, and you may contact me any time via PM here, or e-mail at [email protected].
Thanks, and looking forward to hearing from you, and getting you setup with a quality crypto-currency operation.
submitted by Envrin to Jobs4Bitcoins [link] [comments]

[For Hire] Crypto-Currency / Blockchain Developer -- Experienced and Professional


Just finished developing out a larger wallet platform, so thought I would throw this out there. Briefly, 38 year old Canadian, 19 years high paced and professional experience within online software, with 8 of those years being bitcoin / crypto-currency. I'm the type who knows the protocol inside out, key generation and management, the cryptography to generate addresses and sign txs, BIP32, multi-sig, the message protocol to communicate directly with nodes on the P2P network, etc.
Well versed with online security, and excellent at non-custodial wallet systems where every user gets their own BIP32 wallet and funds are user segregated. Have done dozens of these operations, everything including traditional exchange, P2P exchange ala Localbitcoins, multi-vendor marketplace, merchant payment gateway, secure web wallets, coin mixers, lottery site, block explorer, jobs board, eCommerce, and the list goes on. Can do anything in your imagination.
You can view details of a base system at: https://envrin.com/secure_wallet
Demo admin panel at: https://demo.envrin.com/admin/
For a better idea of who I am and my skillset, I created Apex at: https://apexpl.io/
And if you want an idea of how in-depth I go into the protocol, I wrote an article at: https://apexpl.github.io/bitcoin_cash_sv_abc_transaction_signatures.html
Speaking of that, can now offer full support for the Bitcoin Cash / SV / ABC protocols, plus any Bitcoin deratives. Don't have ETH just yet, but that can be easily added in if your operation requires it.
If you have the desire to jump into the crypto-currency / blockchain game, and need a comprehensive, secure and scalable solution for your operation, I'm your guy. More than happy to provide you with consultation, and answer any questions you have. Rate is $50/hour, and you may contact me any time via PM here, or e-mail at [email protected].
Thanks, and looking forward to hearing from you, and getting you setup with a quality crypto-currency operation.
submitted by Envrin to forhire [link] [comments]

The International 2018 in Vancouver FAQ (Updated!)

Hey there again, you punks.
So with a tip coming from some of the moderators on the board, I've decided just to quickly update this FAQ that I wrote a few months back since TI is next week and I'm sure many of you still have a ton of questions. I've gotten some more information that I can pass down to you in regards to Vancouver but also now TI as well, including updated marijuana laws and beer recommendations.
Two quick notes:

VANCOUVER WEATHER

This summer has been an extremely hot season in Vancouver (at least in Vancouverite standards). Like anyone who attended in Seattle last year, there is noticeable smoke in the air in the city due to the fires all over the Pacific North West. If you have breathing issues or health related problems do to particles in the air, be advised that there is currently an Air Quality Advisory in effect so act accordingly. Wind/Rain will most likely clear up any issues going into next week, but just a heads up in case new fires flare up or we aren't blessed with some light rain. Forecast is looking to be sunny through midweek and the finals, with an average of about 23-25C.

THE PACIFIC NATIONAL EXHIBITION IS OPEN!

A staple for Vancouver residents since 1910, the PNE will be open from August 18th-September 3rd (closed on August 20th & 27th). If you're looking to do something after a midweek day, the PNE is the perfect place to go checkout for a fun night out filled with events, concerts, beer gardens, crazy carny food, rides, maybe BSJ, shopping and a lot more. This article will tell you everything you need to know about the PNE, how to get there and what's going on.
ALSO BOYZ II MEN AUGUST 18TH GET HYPED.

PLACES TO STAY

Yes, but it's not exactly regulated by AirBnB. Feel free to stay at one through AirBnB but know that it might be a little tricky to deal with issues if they come up with your rental. Also while you're at it, check out VRBO.
The general piece of advice you'll get from any local about where to stay for TI is going to be anywhere that's on the Skytrain Expo Line (the line in dark blue). The Expo Line will take you to Stadium-Chinatown station, which is where Rogers Arena is 30 seconds away. As in Seattle, the closer to downtown you are, the more expensive it is to stay.
Unlike Seattle Center, there aren't very many budget hotels left, if at all in the Downtown core. The cheaper hostels are available, though fair warning, many of them are placed on Granville Street, which is a place that many Vancouverites will tell you to avoid while you're here (Though I have never stayed at a hostel on Granville, if anyone has an experience, feel free to share). Check out the Ramada Inn and the Days Inn near Waterfront for some cheaper-ish options.
In my mind, there are two places that I would keep a look-out for avoiding while you visit Vancity.
  1. Granville Street. During the day time it's normally fine, filled with some cool shops (Golden Age Collectibles, The Rock Shop, Movieland Arcade) but it's packed to the absolute max with dumbasses at night due to the amount of night clubs. There's police around every weeknight, but since you're in Vancouver for a good time, head towards Gastown, Chinatown or Main Street for places to party.
  2. Downtown East Side. If you've researched anything about Vancouver, you'll know that this area as where a large portion of the cities homeless reside. There is rampant drug use, poverty and sex work in this neighborhood, focused mainly between 5-10 blocks in the area of Main/Hastings. That being said, the community is an especially strong one, with fantastic human beings supporting the less fortunate. Though there isn't too much danger in terms of being robbed, you might want to just avoid the area at night. Be respectful to the people of this community and you'll have no problems.

TRANSIT

Sadly, no there isn't. We know, it absolutely sucks and everyone in Vancouver is aware. Your options are public transit or a taxi.
Super shitty if you don't like paying for parking. If you can, park outside of the Downtown core near a Skytrain and then head over to the Arena. Commercial Drive is pretty good for this if you can find certain spots. Tinseltown as well if you buy a movie ticket on non-event days.
If you've ever been to any major city, you'll notice that Vancouver shares the same load-up card/tap system that places like London share. It's called Compass Card and it's fairly easy to use. Just load up money onto the card, tap it when you enter and tap when you leave. It'll do all the calculations for you. Note that certain zones will cost more just due to how far you're traveling.
Yes it does! Car2Go and Evo are two of Vancouver's most popular car share services. Hot tip would be to register before you head over to Vancouver and it'll help mitigate the fact that UbeLyft aren't in Vancouver just yet. Just drive safely.
The easiest way to get to downtown from YVR, if you aren't getting picked up/taking a taxi is to take the Canada Line. It will take you directly to Waterfront station, from there you can take multiple buses, the Expo Line (the main line that will take you to Rogers Arena) or the Seabus (going to North VancouveLonsdale).

ALCOHOL

19 years old.
Vancouver has an exploding craft beer culture and you'll be happy to find that the variety of different beers/ciders to drink is absolutely massive, probably to the point of being intimidating.
Here are some of my favorite breweries and the beers that you should look out for when you're at the liquor store/pub:
Twin Sails Brewing
Dat Juice Pale Ale
Two Straws MilkShake IPA
Short Pants Mosaic IPA
Brassneck Brewing
Changeling Sour
Passive Aggressive IPA
Bjorn Again Farmhouse Ale
Steel & Oak
Changeling Sour
Passive Agressive IPA
Bjorn Again Farmhouse Ale
Bomber Brewing
Bomber Parklife Passionfruit Ale
Bomber Pilsner
Bomber Snow White IPA
Yes. First, there isn't any drinking in public if you already didn't know. Second, you must have TWO pieces of ID on you whenever you go to buy drinks in case you're asked for your ID. First piece must be photo ID, the second piece must be something with your name on it (in order for bartenders/servers to validate the first piece). I see a lot of tourists thrown off by this, so just know that Vancouver's liquor laws are much more strict than other places.
I've heard from a few Vancouver residents that this isn't exactly enforced harshly, but just to note that it is an actual law. Piece of mind.
%.05. There will be a ton of pubcrawls and side events going on for people that are attending TI and I'm sure that you'll be blasted one night or another. Please don't drink and drive. If you need a cab, here are the numbers you can contact in order to grab a taxi from downtown.
Yellow Cab: (604) 681-1111
Black Top Cab: (604) 731-1111
MacLure's Cabs: (604) 831-1111
Also, a note for people from outside of Vancouver: the cab drivers in this city are notorious for being hard to deal with at times. Broken debit machines, cash up front, not providing receipts. Use your common sense to get you through pushy cabbies. If they have a broken debit machine and they are still driving, kindly reject them and give your business to another cabbie that will. UbeLyft will be here soon and karma will bite them back.
If at anytime you are in an emergency and don't know what to do, please DM me and I will provide my contact info.

FOOD

Vancouver is a glutenous paradise of places to eat. Instead of giving you specific places to go eat, here are some links that you might find helpful in terms of recommendations:
Meowjin's Guide to TI8
The 38 Essential Vancouver Restaurants
It's To Die For List
This is not confirmed at the moment, but if the rules were anything like Seattle, you will be able to bring outside food into the arena. You are not permitted to bring liquids into the venue. You'll have to dump out your water bottle and refill it once inside. Rogers Arena might have different policies, but thankfully the venue has twice the amount of food stalls including a much more varied selection.
Everyone from Vancouver attending will hate me, but this is going to be one of the hottest tips I can give you: there is a Costco food court DIRECTLY across the street on the lower level of Rogers Arena that DOES NOT require a membership in order to buy food. It is the only Costco food court in Canada that doesn't need a membership to eat there. Hot dogs, poutine, pizza, soft drinks, ice cream and it's all lovingly Costco cheap. Enjoy!

MONEY

Visa/Mastercard are widely accepted everywhere. Cards such as American Express/Discover are also accepted most places, though a few places might reject them for whatever reason (higher charge rates, issues with their machines etc..) Best case would be to make sure you have a Visa/Mastercard with you at all times as a back-up in case you run into any issues. Most places in Vancouver also allow you to use Android/Apple Pay now as well. No bitcoin though.
Well, that's entirely up to you. If you're staying the full week, a few hundred dollars in spare Canadian currency won't hurt you, especially if majority of your spending is going to be on plastic. There's going to be the Secret Shop, but that'll be done through online ordering and not cash payments. Just don't come with nothing. Worst case, always have at least $30-$40 cash on you just in case you run into a bind. It's really entirely up to you and how you plan on spending your time here. Do note that because of the low Canadian dollar, don't be surprised if the price of certain things is higher than usual.
By far it would be the Vancouver Bullion & Currency Exchange due to their lower exchange rates. Banks will more than likely charge you higher rates than the VBCE.

ETIQUETTE

Due to the amount of fires that have started in the Pacific North West the past month or so, please do not throw your cigarette/joint butts into the street, sidewalk, bushes or wherever that isn't a proper garbage. You'll get a ton of dirty looks by locals if you do otherwise.
Canadians are known to be rather polite, we'll answer questions for you or guide you in the right direction (as long as we aren't in a huge rush). As long as you're respectful of the people around you, take care of your hygiene, don't spit on the ground, talk over people in conversation or just avoiding being a total dick, you'll be fine. Though Vancouver is a somewhat socially cold city, that's mainly in dating circles. Get some new Bumble photos up!
Most places won't have the tip included in your bill. It's common courtesy to tip between %10-%15 of your final bill if you enjoyed your meal/drink/service. Feel free to go higher if you had a really excellent time. Some places do include the tip in the bill, but will have it noted usually at the bottom of the menu.
A few. Remove your backpack when you're boarding a bus/SkyTrain in order to create more space for the people around you. Hygiene again is a big one. Remember to fill your Compass card and check your remaining balance at least once a day in case you're transiting a lot. If you see elderly/disabled/parents with strollers attempt to come on board, the polite thing to do would be to offer your seat etc..
Don't worry at all! Vancouver is an extremely multicultural city and the residents here are used to hearing many different languages daily. Best bet is if you struggle communicating with anyone for any reason, download the Google Translate app and use it to answer questions you might have in a discussion.
Use common sense. Most players/talent would be more than willing to sign an autograph or pose for a photo with you. But also be aware that much of the on-screen talent (Slacks, Kaci, panel members) will often have to be running from segment to segment, taking in matches and so on. If they seem to have a minute, ask nicely, thank them for their time and cross one off of the bucket list.
Don't throw things at Slacks.

THE ARENA

No update on this. Rogers Arena is mainly a concrete concourse, surrounded by a viaduct and multiple lower roads. Unlike Seattle Center (which had multiple fields and smaller available venues), the only place large enough outside the Arena that could hold a large crowd with a big screen would most likely be the "main" entrance through Expo Blvd/Pat Quinn Way. There are a few other options in the area, but we're going to have to wait to see how creative Valve is with the space around the Arena. Perhaps they rent out the adjacent parking lots?
No update on this also, but again, there's a lack of outdoor space beyond the concrete concourse. Sportsbar Live will be open, which also gives a view of inside the Arena while you're eating/drinking. But again, it's indoors.
From what I remember from Canucks games, yes, there are stations where you can plug your phone in to charge. But don't be surprised if a company like NVIDIA pops up a charging station outside much like in Seattle.
18,630.
One of the more obvious differences that most people will find from Key Arena to Rogers Arena, is that unlike Key Arena, Rogers doesn't have an open space concept between levels. Meaning, you won't be able to just look up to the third floor and see players hanging out like you normally would. This year, they most likely will be held in the boxes above or in the dressing rooms in the lower levels. Look for autograph times scheduled throughout the week to see your favorite players.
The only thing right now is a Vancouver Whitecaps (MLS) game on August 18th and a BC Lions (CFL) on the 25th. So if you really feel inclined, now you know.

WEED

When: On October 17th, weed will officially be legalized in British Columbia and most parts of Canada.
How: Normally you need a medicinal prescription to purchase marijuana legally. Though, because of the soon to be legalization coming up in a few months, most dispensaries will most likely write you a prescription if you tell them a valid medical reason for the marijuana (Trouble sleeping, chronic joint pain, back pain, headaches, trouble eating etc.). My friends who smoke themselves told me that hot tip, so do with it what you will. Please DO NOT buy weed from a source that isn't verified by another trusted person or a licensed dispensary. You never know what your weed could be laced with.
Where: Here are some dispensaries located close to Rogers Arena.
Bloom Medical Dispensary
The Dub Dispensary
The Medical Cannibis Dispensary
You can't smoke anywhere that frequents children, even if there aren't kids around. So no beaches, public parks, playgrounds etc..
So just, anywhere that's away from people that don't want to partake essentially.
????????????

TICKETS

If you weren't able to buy tickets from Ticket Master, you have a few options.
Post in the TI8 Vancouver Subreddit and ask if anyone has a spare ticket.
Buying tickets from scalpers in front of Rogers Arena is fairly easy and shouldn't be difficult if you understand the basics of haggling.
  1. Know what you're comfortable paying and stick to it. Always remember that number.
  2. Be prepared to just walk away. The longer you stay negotiating, the more you show the scalper how important it is for you to buy the tickets. Play the long game.
  3. The less you talk, the less information you give the scalper. If he says he's got a Midweek ticket for $300, shrug and say no thanks.
  4. Have money in your hand/wallet when you're trying to buy tickets. When they see that the cash is right there, they'll be more inclined to just make the deal and move onto the next one.
You will most likely miss the opening ceremonies, but after that the prices for Midweek tickets will normalize and scalpers will want to just get rid of their tickets at a lesser price.
The advantage you have in this instance is that Vancouver, outside of the LoL tournament at Pacific Colosseum, doesn't have much experience with esports tournaments. So scalpers themselves won't have the same level of patience. The longer you wait to buy your tickets from them, the cheaper you can get them for. Only downside is that you'll be missing games.
The other thing you can do is literally just walk around the outside of the Arena and spot non-scalpers with extra tickets. There are always people who buy extra tickets and are just wanting to get their money back (friends flake on them, they couldn't flip them like they thought).
DO NOT panic and end up buying an overpriced ticket from StubHub, Craigslist or wherever. Tickets will be available, you just have to keep your cool.
The box office at Rogers Arena is located at the bottom of the venue on Expo/Pat Quinn Way at the Toyota Ticket Center. You can pick up your tickets between these times:
Mon, August 20th: 7AM - 9PM
Tue, August 21th: 8AM - 9PM
Wed, August 22nd: 8AM - 9PM
Thu, August 23rd: 8AM - 9PM
Fri, August 24th: 8AM - 9PM
Not sure about the box office times for the Finals. Will update that when I know.

FIRST TIME ATTENDING TI

So first off, understand that EVERYONE there is going for the same reason you are, DOTA. Don't be afraid to go up to people, say hello and start conversations. If they shrug you off, fuck them, they don't deserve your brilliance. Enjoy yourself. Worst case, just create a thread on DOTA saying that you want to go shotgun a few beers. My first TI was pretty much by myself, but the combination of a beer + a garden really did wonders.
Simply put, don't worry as much as your mind is telling you to worry. All the talent (casters/players) are incredibly friendly and are pretty much the same as us, just super stoked to be there. But do give them space if they're working or running around to the next thing.
During TI, after every First Blood in a match, there are potential drops given to in arena attendee's who have registered their badge with their Steam ID. There will be a Steam Link kiosk/section OUTSIDE of Rogers Arena, so look out for it. You must have tapped into the Arena in order to be eligible for those drops.
The link to register your badge to be eligible for these drops will be on the back of your badge when you receive it.
Try to pack as lightly and efficiently as possible. My two main staples during the last two TI's were a water bottle (usually given out in a goody bag for midweek + finals ticket holders) and a portable battery pack for my phone. Also know that you might buy things from the Secret Shop, do some shopping downtown and the last thing you want to do is carry that stuff around with you all day. Though consider bringing a sweater for inside the Arena, as Rogers is a fairly cold one.
HOT TIP
Try checking with bell boys/concierge at any hotels if they can possibly check in some of your bags for you. I tried this at TI7 and was surprised how chill they were. I left them a $5 tip for taking my bags and was free for the rest of the day.
Avoid the Secret Shop on the first day or else you'll just spend the entire day waiting in line. Midweek the shop lines will be much more reasonable.

MISC

Well formatted thread to get you started.
Also a well-detailed Google Map of venues/places that should interest people attending TI for places all across Vancouver
Depending on your situation, here are numbers for emergencies in British Columbia.
Ambulance, fire, police: 911
Poison Control: Lower Mainland: 604-682-5050 Toll-free: 1-800-567-8911
Healthlink BC: 811 Deaf or Hearing Impaired: 711
Crisis Intervention & Suicide Prevention: Call 1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) if you are considering suicide or are concerned about someone who may be.
Mental health support: Call 310-6789 (no need to dial area code) for emotional support, information and resources specific to mental health.
That is Roger Neilson, former Vancouver Canucks head coach and the inventor of towel power. Please treat it nicely!
Right here.
How sweet of you to ask! That would be Lush by Snail Mail.
Please, if you feel like you need to ask any questions, or there should be things added to this FAQ, post here or DM me. There are obviously some things that no one knows right now in regards to potential additions or subtractions from moving the event from Key Arena to Rogers. But I'll try my best to keep this thing updated if people bookmark it for future use.
Enjoy planning your trip to TI!
submitted by Arashie to DotA2 [link] [comments]

Weekly news review (June 15-21)

Weekly news review (June 15-21)
How have you been? I guess it's time to deep dive into last week's news.
https://preview.redd.it/5xpcv035pg631.jpg?width=1200&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=f12701a105d42b008c5c9079cbd91f5ff67a9d32

The deceased owner of the now-defunct Canadian crypto exchange QuadrigaCX was allegedly transferring user funds off the exchange and using them as a security for his own margin trading on other platforms.
“Significant volumes of Cryptocurrency were transferred off Platform outside Quadriga to competitor exchanges into personal accounts controlled by Mr. Cotten. It appears that User Cryptocurrency was traded on these exchanges and in some circumstances used as security for a margin trading account established by Mr. Cotten.”
In addition, Cotten reportedly created fake “identified” accounts on Quadriga under multiple aliases “into which unsupported Deposits were deposited and used to trade within the platform.” This, Ernst & Young, states, resulted in “inflated revenue figures, artificial trades with Users and ultimately the withdrawal of Cryptocurrency deposited by Users.”

Russian hackers, not North Korean, may be the bad actors behind probably the biggest ever theft from a cryptocurrency exchange.
Japanese newspaper Asahi Shimbun reports Monday that virus variants known to be linked to Russian hackers have been found on employee computers at the Tokyo-based Coincheck exchange.
According to the report, the malware found at the exchange had been emailed to employees and included types called Mokes and Netwire, which allow malicious distributors to gain access to victims’ machines and operate them remotely. Mokes apparently first appeared on a Russian bulletin board in 2011, while Netwire has been around for 12 years.

Social media giant Facebook has released the white paper for its long-awaited cryptocurrency and blockchain-based financial infrastructure project on June 18.
According to the paper, Facebook’s global stablecoin, dubbed “libra,” will operate on the native and scalable Libra blockchain, and be backed by a reserve of assets ostensibly “designed to give it intrinsic value” and mitigate volatility fluctuations.
The new cryptocurrency will be governed by a not-for-profit, Switzerland-based consortium — the “Libra Association” — which counts Mastercard, PayPal, Visa, Stripe, eBay, Coinbase, Andreessen Horowitz and Uber among its founding members.
Facebook ostensibly plans to expand the association to around 100 members by the time of Libra’s launch in the first half of 2020.

Bitcoin’s price has set another new high for 2019, reaching $9,599 before retracing slightly to end Thursday’s trading.
The move to fresh 2019 highs comes after the bitcoin price dropped to as low as $8,919 on June 18 before a surge of buying pressure pushed prices back above $9,000 within the same day.

Visa, Mastercard, PayPal, and Uber are all backing Facebook’s new cryptocurrency, according to a new report.
The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday that the social media giant has signed on more than a dozen backers for its GlobalCoin cryptocurrency, a stablecoin that has been developed in secrecy for more than six months. Each of the new backers will invest roughly $10 million in the project as part of a governing consortium for the cryptocurrency.

Let us know what you think!
submitted by rokkex to Rokkex [link] [comments]

AVOID SHADY CRYPTOCURRENCY EXCHANGE EZBTC.CA

I wanted to make this post of my experience as a warning to others, especially Canadians as they have limited buying options when investing (speculating) into cryptocurrencies. I understand the subject of cryptocurrencies are polarizing to many, but nonetheless, it's an emerging asset class that deserves discussion because there are many ways to lose your funds. This isn't the fault of cryptocurrencies themselves, but the result of user error, outright scams, social engineering, hacks, or in my case not being up-to-date on current events.

There are many scams in cryptocurrencies, but shady exchanges are a classic dating back to the legendary Mt. Gox hack where 850,000 Bitcoins were stolen (worth approximately $4.6 billion at the time of this writing). Or the most recent Canadian QuadrigaCX exchange hack where the CEO allegedly died in India carrying the only private key to 200 million worth of customer funds.

It seems that exchange hacks keep propping up in the news, so why then do they keep happening even in 2019? Because users are left with limited choices if they want to acquire cryptocurrency in the safest (ironic) and most convenient manner. In order to buy cryptocurrency, you first have to exchange it for fiat currency (USD, CAD, EUR). You could buy cryptocurrency from one of those Bitcoin ATMs you see at the mall but the fees are exorbitant and quite a few require ID as it is, so why not just sign up for an exchange instead? The next option is to buy them peer-to-peer in person for cash, but people feel unsafe dealing with strangers and large amounts of money. Further, liquidity would be an issue. This led to a boom of many cryptocurrency exchanges offering customers a place to buy and sell with the exchanges acting as the middle-man between users.

I've been away from cryptocurrency for a while and only came back recently. I've used the EZBTC exchange in the past without issues and decided I would use them again. What I didn't do upon my return was my homework on any updates/news regarding this exchange which resulted in my ordeal now. I noticed the website had an overhaul that now includes an express option for you to receive faster withdrawals if you deposited larger amounts (first red flag). I opted for the regular option I always used in the past and sent a small amount via eTransfer that was deposited in my account almost immediately (second red flag). In the past, my eTransfers regardless of amount took some time and up to many hours. Nonetheless, I made a purchase and initiated a withdrawal request that still hasn't been sent out to this day, and I am not the only one.

A condensed version of my story is that I got worried about my pending withdrawal with EZBTC and my emails/calls went unanswered. The live chat on their website was also disabled. I decided to tweet my situation to @ezBtcCanada and immediately got an email from the owner David Smillie himself urgently telling me to call him on a personal number. He deverified and suspended my account as a result of my tweets @tokenflair for "security reasons". After some talk (me saying I'll delete the tweets) he immediately reactivated and reverified my account again and said that my withdrawal will be taken care of the next day.

Fast forward to the next day and my withdrawal is still pending. Calls/texts/email go unanswered again. Live chat is still disabled. I proceed to send another tweet instead. Like clockwork, I get a response from David shortly after and he was livid. He threatened to sue me for defamation if I continued posting about my situation on public forums. I told him I'll be waiting for his letter. He stated that my account would be receiving a lifetime ban and I will not be receiving my withdrawal but I would get an eTransfer refund in 30 days, and all this information would be included in an email I was supposed to receive on Monday April 22, 2019. I still have not received any such email, and my emails/call/texts to him are again being ignored. The saga continues.

The most important piece of advice I can give when it comes to cryptocurrency is that what's true today, is not true tomorrow. You must stay up-to-date on current events in cryptocurrency because your investment could be at stake. In my case, EZBTC was exhibiting red flags and had many user complaints that I would have seen had I just done some research prior to sending my money. I was not up-to-date regarding the status of this "exchange".

David Smillie (owner of ezbtc.ca) operating under business # 1081627 B.C LTD. currently has 5 ongoing lawsuits against his company for unpaid funds:

  1. File number: 1812420 - GOLDLUST, Joseph v 1081627 B.C. LTD. - Supreme Civil (General)
  2. File number: 1963965 - ROBERTS, John v 1081627 B.C. LTD. - Provincial Small Claims
  3. File number: 172818 - GODWIN, Richard v 1081627 BC LTD - Supreme Civil (General)
  4. File number: 18104 - MCCALLUM, Evan v 1081627 BC LTD - Provincial Small Claims
  5. File number: 1862507 - WONG, Gary v 1081627 BC LTD. - Provincial Small Claims

You can get the latest information on all pending lawsuits against EZBTC here:
https://justice.gov.bc.ca/cso/esearch/civil/partySearch.do

List of numerous complaints against David Smillie and EZBTC:

https://files.fm/f/23ej52ff (David Smillie sued by Richard Godwin)

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/bahzsm/another_bc_lawsuit_filed_against_ezbtc_1081627_bc/ (David Smillie sued by John Roberts)

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/99fs6i/2_new_court_filings_against_ezbtc_in_the_past_week/ (More lawsuits)

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/8mjtjb/amaa_exowner_of_ezbtc_resigned_when_i_realized_it/ (Ex-CTO of EZBTC blows whistle)

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/b53zq3/please_sticky_this_post_im_a_developer_who_worked/ (EZBTC developer blows whistle)

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/939ce2/40_days_and_counting_fiat_withdrawal_ezbtcca/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/926adi/ezbtcca_may_have_gone_bust_toronto_offices_have/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/973yrz/ezbtcca_is_likely_insolvent/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/98njea/worth_visiting_ezbtc_offices/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/901847/concern_regarding_ezbtc/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/9181nx/banned_from_ezbtcca_chatroomhave_not_rcvd/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/arnboh/ezbtc_will_my_girlfriend_ever_see_her_money/

https://coiniq.com/ezbtc-review/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/ao680q/what_are_customers_latest_experiences_with_ezbtc/

https://warosu.org/biz/thread/10773849

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/bfqrv1/fortune_jack_here_regarding_david_smillie_and/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/b57fq9/ezbtc_terms_of_service_wayback_machine/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/arfa5x/ezbtc_is_so_fake_check_this_out/

https://np.reddit.com/BitcoinCA/comments/95rpl5/to_those_staying_silent_for_ezbtc_defamation/
submitted by TokenFlair to CanadianInvestor [link] [comments]

A good reminder of what we (BCH) gained from the hardfork, a review of all the lies and broken promises by CSW

From Jonald Fyookball's Medium Article
https://medium.com/@jonaldfyookball/bitcoin-cash-is-finally-free-of-faketoshi-great-days-lie-ahead-bb0c833e4c5d
Some background on Craig’s claim of being Satoshi, for the uninitiated:
  1. He faked blog posts
  2. He faked PGP keys
  3. He faked contracts and emails
  4. He faked threats
  5. He faked a public key signing
  6. He has a well-documented history of fabricating things bitcoin and non-bitcoin related
  7. He faked a bitcoin trust to get free money from the Australian government but was caught and fined over a million dollars.
And specifically concerning his claim to be Satoshi:
  1. He has provided no independently verifiable evidence
  2. He is not technically competent in the subject matter
  3. His writing style is nothing like Satoshi’s
  4. He called bitcoin “Bit Coin” in 2011 when Satoshi never used a space
  5. He actively bought and traded coins from Mt. Gox in 2013 and 2014
  6. He was paid millions for ‘coming out’ as Satoshi as part of the deal to sell his patents to nTrust — for those who claim he was ‘outed’ or had no motive

Caught Red Handed Plagiarizing

No respectable academic, scientist, or professional needs to stoop so low as to steal and take credit for the work of others — least of all Satoshi. Yet, CSW has already been caught at least 3 times plagiarizing.
  1. His paper on selfish mining has full sections copied almost verbatim from a paper written by Liu & Wang.
  2. His “Beyond Godel” paper which purports to claim that Bitcoin script is turing complete, is heavily plagiarized.
  3. A paper on block propagation was blatantly and intentionally plagiarized.

Can’t Even Steal Code Correctly

CSW was also caught attempting to plagiarize a “hello world” program (the simplest of all computer programs).
He apparently does not understand base58 or how Bitcoin address checksums work (both of these are common knowledge to experienced Bitcoiners), and has made other embarrasing errors.
Broken Promises
He said he was building a mining pool to “stop SegWit”
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The Biggest Scams In The Crypto History: Part 2

Here’s the sequel of our previous article. You wanted — you got it. Let’s roll!
OneCoin
OneCoin is a good example of a Ponzi scheme. In 2015, the Indian company One Coin Limited began to issue digital currency without a blockchain and decentralization. The old-school MLM (Multi-Level Marketing) strategy was used for the distribution of coins.
The company was selling a wide range of training packages on crypto trading, mining and successful life. There were textbooks, presentations, and other rubbish, among which were OneCoin tokens. They were supposed to allow users to get even more tokens. But the thing was that only One Coin Limited had exclusive rights to issue of coinage. So there were no other options for mining this coin.
On the international conference the founder of OneCoin, Ruja Ignatova, presents these tokens as the Bitcoin killer. See how easy it is to fool users?
Over the years, the company has spread its network globally. And only in 2017, the project gets into a number of investigations and restrictions. Owners and employees of the company more and more often could not answer questions from investors and carried on with the nonsense about “a bright crypto-future.”
Finally, regulators and banks in Italy, Germany, Hungary, Belize, Thailand and other countries have banned the trade of OneCoin and warned users not to get engaged with this company.
In early March 2019, the current OneCoin cryptocurrency leader Konstantin Ignatov, brother of Ruja Ignatova, was arrested at Los Angeles airport. He is accused of fraud and creating a financial pyramid.
According to the United States Attorney’s Office, Ignatov and his sister misled investors all over the world, and as a result, the people invested billions of dollars in a fraud scheme. They are accused of building a billion-dollar cryptocurrency company, based entirely on deception.
FBI Assistant Director-in-Charge William Sweeney, Jr. said:
“OneCoin was a cryptocurrency existing only in the minds of its creators and their co-conspirators. Unlike authentic cryptocurrencies, which maintain records of their investors’ transaction history, OneCoin had no real value. It offered investors no method of tracing their money, and it could not be used to purchase anything. In fact, the only ones who stood to benefit from its existence were its founders and co-conspirators.”
Despite all hardships, One Coin Limited continues to work. If you check out their website you will find everything there: a meaningless text about the benefits of a “revolutionary” token and other signs of a high-quality international project that deceives people.
QuadrigaCX
It’s not possible to take your savings to the grave, right? More than 100,000 clients of QuadrigaCX are ready to argue with that. So let’s try to recount the details of this strange story.
QuadrigaCX was created in 2013 and was Canada’s largest cryptocurrency exchange.
In December 2018, Gerald Cotten (founder and CEO of the QuadrigaCX) and his wife — Jennifer Robertson, were in India on their honeymoon. During this trip Cotten suddenly passed away from Crohn’s disease. After his death, it turned out that Gerald was the only one who had access to cold wallets of the exchange platform.
Changpeng Zhao (Binance CEO) comments this situation on Twitter:
“That’s sad. There are many solutions to split private keys or signing to achieve 3/5, 5/7 etc. Never neglect security. Also, never have CEO carry private keys. Bad on many levels.”
On January 25, 2019 (that is, almost two months after Cotten’s death) a special meeting was convened to appoint QuadrigaCX’s new directors. As a result, the inconsolable widow Jennifer Robertson, her stepfather Thomas Beazley and Jack Martel were elected to take charge of a company. By the way, this meeting was held by a conference call as the widow was very busy by hastily selling the property of her deceased husband. Indeed, there was something to deal with: a yacht, a plane, and several houses. Also, dearly departed managed to take care of his Chihuahuas by opening a special trust account for them in the amount of $100,000 (which is interesting, as Cotten did not show such forethought about the clients of his company).
It’s worth to mention that the clients of QuadrigaCX had problems with the exchange for a long time — mainly related to the withdrawal of funds. The first wake-up calls took place in March 2018, when press reports negatively about delays in the withdrawal of funds the total amount of which exceeded $100,000. But that’s all just moonshine compared to the fact that in June 2017 the exchange platform lost about 15 million Canadian dollars — as explained to the community, due to a bug in the smart contract. As a result, the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC) froze about $22 million in QuadrigaCX accounts. This happened in November 2018, and for all users, it would have meant the end of a remarkable business but Mr. Cotten wasn’t explaining the problems to customers, wasn’t trying to solve them, and so on. He had just married and went on a honeymoon trip to pass away exactly two weeks after freezing the accounts.
As the inconsolable widow stated in her testimony:
“To the best of my knowledge, most of the businesses of these companies was being conducted by Gerry whenever and wherever he and his computer were located”.
In February 2019, the head of Coinbase — Brian Armstrong unveiled the results of an independent investigation into the QuadrigaCX. He reported on his Twitter account the following:
“Sequence of events suggests this was a mismanagement with later attempt to cover for it.” “This implies that at least few people inside Qadriga knew that they were running fractional. If so, then it’s possible that untimely death of their CEO was used as an outlet to let the company sink”.
Brian Armstrong stressed that QuadrigaCX users started complaining about problems with withdrawing money long before Gerald Cotten’s death. Thus, the company management decided to invent a story about private keys on the laptop of the CEO to hide the financial insolvency, one of the reasons for which could be inefficient management.
Nowadays, the Canadian cryptocurrency exchange QuadrigaCX is officially bankrupt. Users of the closed Quadriga are now leading legal battles in order to recover their funds. The total amount of which is about $190 million in crypto. The exact circumstances of the disappearance of user deposits remain uncertain.
Do you think the story with QuadrigaCX was Exit Scam or Mismanagement?
Bitfinex
One of the largest crypto scandals of the year broke out on April 30, 2019. The New York State Attorney General’s Office has filed serious accusations against the biggest exchange platform — Bitfinex. According to Leticia James, the exchange platform used the reserves of Tether, an affiliated company to cover up a loss of $850 million.
Questions to Tether have been in the air for a long time. In January 2018, the critics of the main stablecoin assumed that the company, in fact, produced more coins than it actually could sustain. Some critics accused the Bitfinex in fraud and manipulation of Tether’s rate and influenced through it on the price of Bitcoin.
So what’s up with the Bitfinex? Investigators of the prosecutor’s office claim that the lost money belonged to the clients and iFinex corporation. That is why, back in October 2018, Bitfinex started having problems with the withdrawal of the funds: the clients complained about long response time and a delay in receiving currency. According to the authorities, Bitfinex transferred $850 million to Crypto Capital Corp., the payment company. The Tether reserves were used to fill the gap, but this information was not disclosed to the public. According to the first data, Tether provided funding in the amount of at least $700 million for this purposes. Withdrawing this amount of currency severely shook faith in the idea that Tether tokens are indeed fully backed by dollars.
And then Bitfinex had extraordinary difficulties in satisfying the withdrawal demands from the platform since Crypto Capital refused to process withdrawals or simply could not return any funds. One of the senior Bitfinex executives opened a can of worms by writing the following:
“Please understand all this could be extremely dangerous for everybody, the entire crypto community. BTC could tank to below 1k if we don’t act quickly.”
Soon after it was known about the serious accusations against companies, Bitfinex’s users began to panic. They started buying Bitcoin and trying to get rid of their assets in USDT. As a result, BTC was trading $350+ (6.75%) more expensive than the crypto market average.
Tether and Bitfinex published a joint statement on their official blogs in response to the allegations of missing funds. The posts allege that the companies did not receive any preliminary warnings, as well as that lawsuits from the New York Prosecutor General’s Office were “riddled with false assertions”.
According to the latest information, Bitfinex is supposed to release its own token and attract $1 billion in Tether through IEO.
What do you think about these scandals and scams? Tell us your thoughts in the comments below.
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